18 Sep

Benefits of Homeownership Reaffirmed in New Study

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Posted by: Iko Maurovski

Despite deteriorating housing affordability across the country, buying a home is still the more affordable option when compared to renting.

A new report from Mortgage Professionals Canada has determined that, despite the rapid rise in home price, those who are able to invest in a home would end up “significantly better off” in the long term compared to renting.

The report, authored by the mortgage broker association’s chief economist Will Dunning, found that while upfront monthly costs are in fact cheaper in most locations, the “net” cost of ownership is less than the equivalent cost of renting in a majority of cases, and becomes even more cost effective over time.

“The costs of owning and renting continue to rise across Canada,” Dunning noted. “However, rents continue to rise over time whereas the largest cost of homeownership–the mortgage payment–typically maintains a fixed amount over a set period of time – usually for the first five years. The result is that the cost of renting will increase more rapidly than the cost of homeownership.”

Additionally, the costs of ownership include considerable amounts of repayment of the mortgage principal. “When this saving is considered, the ‘net’ or ‘effective’ cost of homeownership is correspondingly reduced,” Dunning added.

On average, the monthly cost of owning exceeds the cost of renting by $541 per month. But when principal repayment is considered, the net cost of owning falls to $449 less than renting.

Interest Rate Scenarios

The analysis compared the cost of renting vs. owning both five and 10 years into the future, with higher interest rates factored into the equation. In all cases, owning comes out ahead:

Scenario #1: If interest rates remain the same (using an average of 3.25%), after 10 years the average net cost of owning is $1,014 less than the monthly cost of renting.

Scenario #2: If interest rates rise to 4.25% after five years, the average net cost of owning falls to $1,295 less than the monthly cost of renting.

Scenario #3: If interest rates rise to 5.25% after five years, the average net cost of owning is still $726 less than the monthly cost of renting.

“By the time the mortgage is fully repaid in 25 years (or less) the cost of owning will be vastly lower than the cost of renting,” the report adds, noting that the cost of owning, on average, would be $1,549 per month vs. $4,655 for an equivalent dwelling.

Canada Still a Country of Homeowners

Despite rising home prices and deteriorating affordability, Canada remains a nation of aspiring homeowners.

The study pointed to the continued strong resale activity as one indicator of this.

Resale activity in 2017 was still the third-highest year on record, at 516,500 sales, just off the peak of 541,2220 sales in 2016.

But other polls have also found a strong desire among younger generations that still dream of owning.

RBC’s Homeownership Poll found a seven-percentage-point increase in the percentage of overall Canadians who planned to buy a home within the next two years (32%), and a full 50% of millennials.

Similarly, a RE/MAX poll found more than half of “Generation Z” (those aged 18-24) also hope to own a home within the next few years.

Perhaps the biggest question is whether those aspiring homeowners will have the means to surpass the barriers to homeownership, namely larger down payments and the government’s new stress test.

“While recent changes to mortgage qualifying have made the barrier to entry higher, those who can qualify will be much better off in the long term,” Paul Taylor, President and CEO of Mortgage Professionals Canada said in a statement. “Given the economic advantages of homeownership, Mortgage Professionals Canada would recommend the government consider ways to enable more middle-class Canadians to achieve homeownership.”

Despite its affordability benefit over renting, Dunning addresses some of the impediments of homeownership, namely the longer timeframe needed to save for the down payment. Despite higher home prices and larger down payments required, first-time buyers still made an average 20% down payment.

Additional Tidbits from the Report

Some additional data included in Dunning’s report include:

  • Average house price rose 6.2% per year from $154,563 in 1997 to $510,090 in 2017
  • Average weekly wage growth was up just 2.6% per year from 1997 to 2017
  • The average minimum interest rate for the stress test during the study period: 5.26%
  • The average annual rates of increase for the following housing costs:
    • Property taxes: 2.8%
    • Repairs: 1.9%
    • Home insurance: 5.4%
    • Utilities: 1.6%
    • Rents: 2.4%

Your Interest is my Only Interest

 

11 Sep

Here’s what Canadian homeowners should know about the housing market in September

Latest News

Posted by: Iko Maurovski

The Canadian housing market is facing significant headwinds heading into the fall, and it’s still unclear how it will navigate them.

From a rising interest rate environment, to worryingly high levels of household debt, there are several factors the industry experts are telling homeowners and would-be buyers to consider.

For a closer look at what could affect the market this month, Livabl has rounded up the latest industry commentary, to keep you in the know.

An interest rate hike is on its way

The Bank of Canada chose not to hike the overnight rate this week — but that doesn’t mean it won’t in the near future.

In its release, the Bank noted that the housing market is “beginning to stabilize as households adjust to higher interest rates and changes in housing policies.” That, combined with an acknowledgement that the debt burden among households is starting to lower, has TD senior economist Brian DePratto predicting that the Bank will choose to hike the overnight rate in October.

“The Bank of Canada made it clear that it is still on track to raise interest rates again this year,” he wrote, in a note. “The Canadian economy is indeed evolving in line with its projections, with the desired rotation of demand towards investment and exports, and a stabilization of the housing market after a difficult start to the year…We believe the BoC will raise interest rates at its October meeting, consistent with its gradual approach to policy normalization.”

As the overnight rate climbs, mortgage rates will also be pushed upwards, possibly causing some would-be buyers to reconsider entering the housing market. Beyond causing a slowdown in activity, a rate increase would weigh on existing homeowners, who might struggle to make higher mortgage payments.

Affordability is deteriorating

As interest rates moved upwards, housing affordability deteriorated in most major Canadian markets last quarter.
The Bank of Canada hiked the overnight rate to 1.50 per cent in July, and mortgage rates followed suit.

The ratio of homeowners mortgage payments in comparison to their income, known as MPPI, rose 0.2 per cent in Q2, after a 1.2 per cent rise in Q1, marking 12 months of consecutive deterioration. In total, seven of 10 major markets saw their MMPI rise last quarter.

“Mortgage interest rates were on the rise for a fourth consecutive quarter in Q2,” wrote National Bank economists Matthieu Arseneau and Kyle Dahms. “Unsurprisingly, the rise in interest rates hit harder for the priciest markets in the country.”

Household debt is still a concern

That deteriorating affordability is bad news for Canadians household debt levels, which are still worryingly high.

“Risks around housing appear to have dissipated with the national market stabilizing in recent months,” wrote BMO senior economist Benjamin Reitzes, in a recent note. “[But] household debt is an issue that isn’t going to be resolved anytime soon.”

While Canada’s debt-to-disposable income ratio eased from 169.7 to 168 per cent in the first quarter of 2018, Canadians still have some of the highest debt levels in the world.

“The [Bank of Canada] is continuously collecting data on how households are coping with rising rates, while the macro data suggest the moves have been manageable thus far,” wrote Reitzes. “The slowing housing market and new mortgage rules have caused debt growth to decelerate, but it’s going to take time to work off debt burdens and bring debt ratios down.”

Your Interest is my Only Interest

Iko M.

Mortgage Broker

647-200-0723

http://ikomaurovski.com/

7 Aug

CMHC changes to assist self-employed borrowers

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Posted by: Iko Maurovski

Self-employed Canadians will be happy to hear that CMHC is willing to make some changes that will make it easier to qualify for a mortgage.

In an announcement on July 19, 2018, the CMHC has said “Self-employed Canadians represent a significant part of the Canadian workforce. These policy changes respond to that reality by making it easier for self-employed borrowers to obtain CMHC mortgage loan insurance and benefit from competitive interest rates.” — Romy Bowers, Chief Commercial Officer, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. These policy changes are to take effect Oct. 1, 2018.

Traditionally self-employed borrowers will write as many expenses as they can to minimize the income tax they pay each year. While this is a good tax-saving technique, it means that often a realistic annual income cannot be established high enough to meet mortgage qualification guidelines.

Plain speak, self-employed people don’t look good on paper.

Normally CMHC wants to see two years established business history to be able to determine an average income. But the agency said it will now make allowances for people who acquire existing businesses, can demonstrate sufficient cash reserves, who will be expecting predictable earnings and have previous training and education.

Take for example a borrower that has been an interior designer with a firm for the past eight years and in the same industry for the past 30 years, but just struck out on his own last year. His main work contract is with the firm he used to work for, but now he has the ability to pick up additional contracts from the industry in which he has vast connections.

Where previously he would have had to entertain a mortgage with an interest rate at least 1% higher than the best on the market and have to pay a fee, now he would be able to meet insurance requirements and get preferred rates.

The other change that CMHC has made is to allow for more flexible documentation of income and the ability to look at Statements of Business Professional Activity from a sole-proprietor’s income tax submission to support Add Backs of certain write-offs to support a grossing-up of income. Basically, recognizing that many write-offs are simply for tax-saving purposes and are not a reduction of actual income. This could mean a significant increase in income and buying power.

It is refreshing after years of government claw-backs and conservative policy changes to finally see the swing back in the other direction. Self-employed Canadians have taken on the burden of an often fluctuating income and responsible income tax management all for the ability to work for themselves. These measures will help them with the reward of being able to own their own home as well.

Your Interest is my Only Interest

Iko M.

647-200-0723

Welcome

 

19 Jun

The Spring Housing Market Continues To Be Weak

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Posted by: Iko Maurovski

As we said last month, April is usually the start of a spring housing market ramp-up, but this year the new mortgage stress test and rising mortgage rates have continued to be a negative factor. Those expecting an early-stage pick-up marking an end to the payback for sales pulled forward into the fourth quarter of last year have been sorely disappointed. With another month of data released by the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) on Friday, it is evident that the disappointing housing picture continued in May. There is no indication of any real rebound in home resale activity through May.

National home sales via the Canadian MLS Systems remained little changed from April to May. Having slipped 0.1% lower, it marked the lowest level for national sales activity in more than five years. Slightly more than half of all local housing markets reported fewer sales in May compared to April, led by the Okanagan region, Chilliwack and the Fraser Valley, together with the Durham region of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and Quebec City. Declines in activity were offset by gains in Calgary, Thunder Bay, Brantford, London and St. Thomas, Oakville-Milton and the Quinte Region west of Kingston. A small increase in GTA sales also supported the national tally.

On a positive note, sales have stabilized suggesting that buyers could be adjusting to the impact of tighter mortgage rules and higher interest rates. After all, sales did climb 1.6% in Toronto, after falling to recession-era lows in April.

Still, CREA cut its 2018 sales forecast to 459,500 nationwide, which would represent an 11% decline from the 2017 pace. In March, the group had predicted a 7.1% slide.

Existing home sales in Canada remain stuck at a six-year low of 436,500 units on a seasonally adjusted annualized basis in May, representing the fifth consecutive monthly decline. The stress test, along with higher mortgage rates and new market-cooling measures in British Columbia continue to keep homebuyers on the sidelines. Not even a material rise in new listings (up 5.1%) enticed them back into play. Activity was at a virtual standstill last month in all three of Canada’s largest markets— Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal.

Actual (not seasonally adjusted) activity was down 16.2% compared to May 2017 and reached a seven-year low for the month. It also stood 5.5% below the 10-year average for the month of May. Activity came in below year-ago levels in about 80% of all local markets, led overwhelmingly by those in and around the Lower Mainland of British Columbia and the Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH) region in Ontario.

“This year’s new stress-test became even more restrictive in May since the interest rate used to qualify mortgage applications rose early in the month,” said, Gregory Klump, CREA’s Chief Economist. “Movements in the stress test interest rate are beyond the control of policymakers. Further increases in the rate could weigh on home sales activity at a time when Canadian economic growth is facing headwinds from U.S. trade policy frictions.”

New Listings
The number of newly listed homes rose 5.1% in May but remained below year-ago levels. New listings rose in about three-quarters of all local markets, led by Edmonton, Calgary, Montreal, Quebec City, Ottawa and the GTA.
With new listings up and sales virtually unchanged, the national sales-to-new listings ratio eased to 50.6% in May compared to 53.2% in April and stayed within short reach of the long-term average of 53.4%. Based on a comparison of the sales-to-new listings ratio with its long-term average, about two-thirds of all local markets were in balanced market territory in May 2018. There were 5.7 months of inventory on a national basis at the end of May 2018. While this marks a three-year high for the measure, it remains near the long-term average of 5.2 months.

Home Prices
On a national basis, the Aggregate Composite MLS Home Price Index (HPI) rose only 1.0% y/y (year-over-year) in May 2018, marking the 13th consecutive month of decelerating y/y gains. It was also the smallest annual increase since September 2009.
Decelerating year-over-year home price gains largely reflect trends among GGH housing markets tracked by the index. While home prices in the region have stabilized and begun trending higher on a monthly basis, rapid price gains recorded one year ago have contributed to deteriorating y/y price comparisons. If recent trends remain intact, year-over-year comparisons will likely improve in the months ahead.
Condo apartment units again posted the most substantial y/y price gains in May(+12.7%), followed by townhouse/row units (+4.9%). By contrast, one-storey and two-storey single-family home prices were down (-1.5% and -4.7% y/y respectively), very much in line with what we saw last month.

Benchmark home prices in May were up from year-ago levels in 8 of the 15 markets tracked by the index (see Table below).
Composite benchmark home prices in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia continue to trend upward after having dipped briefly in the second half of 2016 (Greater Vancouver (GVA): +11.5% y/y; Fraser Valley: +20.6% y/y). Apartment and townhouse/row units have been mainly driving this regional trend while single-family home prices in the GVA have stabilized. In the Fraser Valley, single-family home prices have also started rising.
Benchmark home prices were up by 11.5% on a y/y basis in Victoria and by 18.1% elsewhere on Vancouver Island.

Within the GGH region, price gains have slowed considerably on a y/y basis but remain above year-ago levels in Guelph (+3.8%). By contrast, home prices in the GTA, Oakville-Milton and Barrie were down from where they stood one year earlier (GTA: -5.4% y/y; Oakville-Milton: -5.9% y/y; Barrie and District: -6.3% y/y). This reflects rapid price growth recorded one year ago and masks recent month-over-month price gains in these markets.

Calgary and Edmonton benchmark home prices were down slightly on a y/y basis in May (Calgary: -0.5% y/y; Edmonton: -0.9% y/y), while prices in Regina and Saskatoon were down more noticeably from year-ago levels (-6.2% y/y and -2.7% y/y, respectively).
Benchmark home prices rose by 8.2% y/y in Ottawa (led by a 9.5% increase in two-storey single-family home prices), by 6.7% in Greater Montreal (driven by a 7.3% increase in two-storey single-family home prices) and by 4.3% in Greater Moncton (led by a 4.8% increase in townhouse/row unit prices).

Bottom Line
Housing markets continue to adjust to regulatory and government tightening as well as to higher mortgage rates. The speculative frenzy has cooled, and multiple bidding situations are no longer commonplace in Toronto and surrounding areas. Home prices in the detached single-family space will remain soft for some time, and residential markets are now balanced or favour buyers across the country. The hottest sector remains condos where buyers face limited supply.

Owing to the housing slowdown, a general slowing in the Canadian economy and significant trade uncertainty, the Bank of Canada has taken a very cautious stance. However, at their last meeting, monetary policymakers have signalled that a rate hike is coming, likely when they next meet on July 11.
Five-year fixed mortgage rates have already risen roughly 110 basis points, while rates for new variable mortgages rose by close to 40 basis points. Since the implementation of new mortgage standards, nonprice lending conditions for mortgages and home equity lines of credit have also tightened.

In the Bank of Canada’s recently released Financial System Review, the central bank analysts observed that the updated Guideline B-20, which took effect at the beginning of this year, “is dampening credit growth and improving the quality of new mortgage lending, especially in regions with the highest house prices. For example, because of the new mortgage interest rate stress test, the size of a 5-year, fixed-rate mortgage with a 25-year amortization that a median-income borrower in Canada can qualify for dropped by about $82,000 to $373,000. The stress test will have more significant effects in markets such as the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and Greater Vancouver Area (GVA), where house prices are higher relative to incomes and low-ratio mortgages are more common.

Your Interest is my Only Interest

Iko M.

647-200-0723

27 Mar

GETTING PRE-APPROVED FOR A MORTGAGE THIS SPRING

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Posted by: Iko Maurovski

Apparently, as per the weather experts, March has a lot of snowfall and surprisingly so does April!
Hearing this on the radio gives you a wave of emotions: holy cow, oh great, I wonder how many vacation days I have left and when can I take down my Christmas lights.
Good news, those same weather experts are predicting a hot summer and you know what that means! Buy your fan(s) now before they run out and check out a pool, size and budget appropriate, for the backyard. So glad we have a compressor to blow that thing up every year; three rings take a lot of breath!
Normally by April you are thinking about moving because you need a bigger home, you need to down size, or its time to leave the basement of your family home.
Those weekends where you have little to do so you opt to go out, get a coffee and go to show homes and see how they decorate because the DIY on TV is all reruns. While you are there, you start to picture yourself living there and then begin to wonder, “can I do this?” Do I want to want to do all the landscaping, do I need a developed basement now or later, where are the schools? Maybe should I think about an already established community with lots of schools, trees, or place that my cat and I can live.
Working with your Dominion Lending Centres Mortgage Professional, we will review your options, your affordability, possible extra costs that you may have missed and finally, get you pre-approved!

Prequalified or rate hold, what is the difference?
Your broker has asked you for supporting documentation that will confirm your income, you do indeed have a down payment, and your debt is not more than you can handle along with possible new housing costs. This is so they can start the application to ensure the numbers are good and we can begin.

  • Rate Hold – it is just that, a rate that lender is offering and, based on the application submitted to them, it shows the numbers are in alignment for them to hold a rate for you. This rate can be held anywhere from 90 – 120 days. Remember, they have reviewed the application submitted only and no other supporting documentation.
  • Prequalified – it is just that, the lender has reviewed the supporting paperwork along with the application and is in happy to provide you with a prequalified letter stating they not only are they holding the rate for 90 – 120 days, depending on which lender, but you have met their criteria for lending.

o Although once you present you offer they may still have a few more items they want to check:
▪ You still working? – you will need a current paystub
▪ You still working at the same place?
▪ You didn’t buy a new car, right? Ugh!
▪ You didn’t get new furniture and finance it with the store, right? Ugh!

Ask your advisor about the DO’s and DON’Ts; this one single sheet of paper will make or break a deal!
Prequalified or rate hold, now you know the difference.

Your Interest is my Only Interest

Iko M.

647-200-0723

 

By: Karren Panner

5 Mar

TIPS FOR YOUR VARIABLE RATE MORTGAGE THAT COULD SAVE YOU THOUSANDS

General

Posted by: Iko Maurovski

With changes to mortgage rules and interest rates on the rise here are some tips for your variable rate mortgage that could save you thousands.

Since 2009 the prime lending rate has shifted from a high of 6% down to 2% range remaining fairly level for the past few years before rising to a present day level of 3.45%. During that time, lenders have offered consumers high discount variable mortgage as low as 1.2% when rates were at their lowest, to current rates of 2.45 (depending on the lender and if the mortgage is insured or not).

Historically the choice of a variable rate mortgage over a fixed term has allowed borrowers to save in interest costs.

I always recommend if my clients can qualify and it makes sense for their specific situation to choose variable only if they will take full advantage of the lower rate. By setting their payment to the equivalent of the 5 year fixed rate at the time, the difference in payment goes directly to principal pay down.

Every 10% increase in payment shaves three years off the amortization of a five-year term so every bit extra matters and can make a difference.

If your mortgage is maturing in the next 90-180 days, it is time to talk to your Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional for tips for your variable rate mortgage that could save you thousands.

You may feel the pressure to lock in to a fixed rate after the recent increases in the prime lending rate. For some this may be an option. However, I have the same advice every time someone asks me this question: It depends on your situation and we need to do a review. Take the extra time to review the current rate, remaining term of the mortgage, the new offer, how that will impact payments and your plans for staying in your home, moving and/or if this is an investment property.

For example Amy and Jake have a current balance of $300,000 on their mortgage with a variable rate at Prime minus .80% (2.65%). Current payments set at $703 bi-weekly. The mortgage matures in 24 months but they are considering to lock in for a new five-year term offered at 3.34%. New payments would be $739. They love their condo but not sure if they will stay or move in two years or not.

After a review of their mortgage we offer a second option. Keep the remaining variable rate mortgage in place for the remaining two years. Set payments at 3.34% or $739 bi-weekly.

They decide on this second option because:

  • In 24 months the savings on interest is $4,000 and their outstanding balance is $4,000 less than by staying in the fixed rate
  • They won’t be locked into a mortgage for another five years
  • If they choose to sell before the maturity date, the penalty on a variable mortgage is only three months interest
  • In two years they can either choose to stay with the same lender or move to another lender without penalty

With this strategy they don’t have to feel pressured into locking in today and they can continue to take advantage of the lower variable rate.

So if you are in a variable rate mortgage and not sure what to do. Remember my tips for your variable rate mortgage that could save you thousands.

You can fine More Info about Variable rate mortgages at:  http://ikomaurovski.com/general/variable-rate-mortgage/

Call 647-200-0723

Your Interest is my Only Interest

 

By: Pauline Tonkin

 

26 Feb

BANK VS. CREDIT UNION – A WHO IS WHO IN BORROWING

General

Posted by: Iko Maurovski

Banks and Credit unions are often grouped together into one category under “financial institutions”. While they may have several similarities in terms of financial service offerings, in the world of mortgages the banks and credit unions have little in common. As mortgage professionals, we work with both of them and are well versed in the differences between the two. To start with, we will first need to look at the definition of each institution.

A BANK

A bank is a financial institution that accepts deposits, lends money and transfers funds. They are listed as public, licensed corporations and have declared earnings that are paid to stockholders. A key point: they are regulated by the federal government-Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions.

A CREDIT UNION

Credit unions also deposit, lend and transfer funds. However, after that, we run into some differences between the two. Credit Unions have an elected Board of Directors that consist of elected members from their community. They are local and community-based organizations and unlike the banks, they are not federally but Provincially regulated.

Now that we have to clear definitions, we are going to focus on just one of the differences between the two: Who they are regulated by. Credit Unions are not regulated by OSFI therefore, they are not always subject to the mortgage lending rules imposed by the federal government (at least not right away). Take for example the recent changes to the B-20 guidelines. Since Credit Unions are not classified as a Federally Regulated Institution, they currently do not need to comply with the implications listed in the new rule changes. What does this mean for the consumer? Let’s walk through an example.

Say you have a dual income family with a combined annual income of $85,000. The current value of their home is listed at $700,000 and they have a mortgage balance of $415,000. Lenders have agreed to refinance to a maximum amount of 80% LTV (loan to value). That gives us a total of $560,000 minus the existing mortgage and you have $145,000 available provided you qualify to borrow it.

Now let’s put the Bank and the Credit Union toe-to-toe:

Difference between Bank and Credit Union when Refinancing

That means you are able to qualify for $105,000 LESS with the bank when refinancing!

Take the same scenario listed above and let’s apply it to purchasing:

Difference between Bank and Credit Union when Purchasing a Home

Again, you have a reduced amount of $105,000 towards the purchase of your new home.

A few disadvantages to Credit Unions that you should be aware of:

  • You cannot port your mortgage out of province
  • With the introduction of the new B-20 guidelines, there has been an increased demand for Credit Unions. This increasing demand has led to higher rates and sometimes these are not the most competitive for the client. Working with a broker can ensure that you receive the best rate and product for your situation.
  • Credit Unions also have a typically lower debt qualification ratio for how much house you can afford and how much debt you can carry

With those considerations, there are limitations to what Credit Unions are able to offer you. As always, working with a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional is one of the best ways to ensure you are not only getting the sharpest rate, but also the best product for you and your unique situation. Give me a call today-I would love to talk to you about your options and how I can help you.

Your Interest is my Only Interest

For more info please visit  http://ikomaurovski.com/

20 Feb

IMPROVING YOUR CREDIT SCORE

General

Posted by: Iko Maurovski

Your credit score is a big factor when you apply for a mortgage. It can dictate how good your interest rate will be and the type of mortgage you qualify for.

Mortgage Professionals are experienced helping clients with a wide range of credit scores so we can find you a mortgage product even if your credit is far from perfect.

The good news about your credit score is that it can be improved:

  • Stop looking for more credit. If you’re frequently seeking credit that can affect your score as can the size of the balances you carry. Every time you apply for credit there is a hard credit check. It is particularly important that you not apply for a credit card in the six months leading up to your mortgage application. These credit checks may stay on your file for up to three years.
  • If your credit card is maxed out all the time, that’s going to hurt your credit score. Make some small monthly regular payments to reduce your balance and start using your debit card more. It’s important that you try to keep your balance under 30% or even 20% of your credit limit.
  • Make your credit payments on time. People are often surprised that not paying their cell phone bill can hurt their credit score in the same way as not making their mortgage payment.
  • You should use your credit cards at least every few months. That’s so its use is reported to credit reporting agencies. As long as you pay the balance off quickly you won’t pay any interest.
  • You may wish to consider special credit cards used to rebuild credit. You simply make a deposit on the card and you get a credit limit for the value of that deposit. They are easy to get because the credit card company isn’t taking any risks.

Your Interest is my Only Interest

www.ikomaurovski.com

 

15 Feb

6 HOME PURCHASE CLOSING COSTS

General

Posted by: Iko Maurovski

When you purchase your new home, there are 6 additional costs to account for. They include:

  • Home Fire and Flood Insurance
  • Title Insurance
  • Legal Fees
  • Adjustments
  • Land Transfer Tax
  • GST

Home and Fire Insurance. Mortgage lenders will require a certificate of fire insurance to be in place by the time you take possession of your home. The amount required is generally at least the amount of the mortgage or the replacement cost of the home. This cost can vary on the property size and extras being insured, as well as the insurance company and the municipality. Home insurance can vary anywhere from $400 per year for condos to $2,000 for large homes.

Title Insurance. This is a one-time fee of about $150 and it protects you against any issues, defects or fraud on your title. Your lawyer or notary helps you purchase this.

Legal Fees. Thirdly, you are required to pay legal fees. Your lawyer or notary will charge you anywhere from $700 to $1,000 to help with your purchase. There are also fees to register your title with the municipalities. All told, you’re looking at around $1,000 to 1,300, after tax.

Adjustments. An adjustment is a cost to you to pay the seller back for prepaying any property tax or condo fees on your behalf. Simply put, if you take possession in the middle of a month, the seller has already paid for the whole month and you must pay the seller back for what they’re not using.

Land transfer tax. Land transfer tax, or property transfer tax (PTT).First-time home buyers are exempt from  provincial government fee.

GST.  GST is only paid on new construction purchases. GST is 5% on the purchase price. However, there is a partial GST rebate on properties under $450,000.

There is one extra fee which is not applicable on each transaction, and it is apply only if you have to bridge your mortgage.

Click below to find more info about it. http://ikomaurovski.com/general/understanding-bridge-financing-works/

Your Interest is my Only Interest

Iko 647-200-0723

7 Feb

WHAT IS A PROPERTY ASSESSMENT VS A HOME APPRAISAL?

General

Posted by: Iko Maurovski

It’s the time of year when many homeowners are getting their property assessments.

The real estate market is the single biggest influence on market values. Market forces vary from year to year and from property to property. The market value on an assessment notice may differ from that shown on a bank mortgage appraisal or a real estate appraisal because an assessment’s appraisal reflects the value at a different time of the year, while a private appraisal can be done at any time.

Use your Assessment as a starting point for the value of the property your planning your home purchase… Do not rely on a provincial assessment for the exact value of the property you’re considering purchasing. Markets can change quickly both increasing and decreasing in value depending on the area.

What is a Home Appraisal?
An appraisal is a document that gives an estimate of a property’s current fair market value.

Often there is no connection between a provincial assessment and appraised value. This is why lenders want an appraisal – an independent evaluation of the properties value at this moment in time.

Primarily home appraisals are completed at the request of a lender. Lenders want to know the value of a property in the current market before they are willing to lend against the home.

The appraisal is performed by an “appraiser” who is typically an educated, licensed, and heavily regulated third party offering an unbiased valuation of the property in question, trained to render expert opinions concerning property values.

When an appraisal is done, consideration is given to the property, the home, its location, amenities, as well as its physical condition.

Appraisals may also be required when an owner has less than 20% down payment and needs mortgage default insurance.

Who pays for the Home Appraisal?
Typically, the borrower pays the cost of the appraisal, and upon completion, the appraisal goes directly to the lender (does not go into the home buyer’s hands).

I know it sounds odd, but brokerages, lenders and appraisers cannot just show the buyer the appraisal on a property, even though the borrower paid for it.

Think of an appraisal as an administrative fee for finding today’s current value of the property
You need a Home Appraisal since the lender doesn’t want to lend on a poor investment and the appraisal helps the buyer decide if the property is worth what they offered (especially in hot markets like Vancouver & Toronto).

Why don’t you get a copy of the appraisal? The appraiser considers their client to be the lender (the reason the appraisal was ordered). The lender has guidelines for the appraisal, and the appraiser prepares his report according to those parameters.

The lender is free to share the appraisal with the borrower, but the appraiser cannot share it. This is because the lender is the client… NOT the borrower!! It doesn’t matter who pays for the appraisal.

Sometimes an appraisal can come in lower than the purchase price, causing angry calls to the Appraisal Institute of Canada (AIC), and the answer they give is: the Brokerage or Lender is the client of the appraiser, and as such has ownership of the report.

One of the main reasons the buyer pays for the appraisal, is that if the mortgage doesn’t go through, the lender does not want to be on the hook for paying for the appraisal and not getting the business.

Lenders are also aware that home buyers could take the appraisal and shop it around with other Lenders to try and get a better deal.

It is rare for Lenders to share the report. With most appraisal companies, the appraisal is only provided after the closing of the mortgage transaction and must have the lender’s approval.

After the funding of your mortgage, some mortgage brokers will refund the appraisal fee or sometimes the lender may agree to reimburse the cost of the appraisal.

While a lender does not have to release the entire appraisal, there are some pieces of information that remain the personal property of the buyer, and PIPEDA legislation guarantees them access to that. However, any information on the report that does not relate to the property itself (such as the neighboring properties or other data about the community) would come off the report before the lender provided it.

Some other reasons for getting an Appraisal:

  • to establish a reasonable price when selling real estate
  • to establish the replacement cost (insurance purposes).
  • to contest high property taxes.
  • to settle a divorce.
  • to settle an estate.
  • to use as a negotiation tool (in real estate transactions).
  • because a government agency requires it.
  • lawsuit

Getting your home ready for an Appraisal:
The appraiser report involves a report including pictures of the home and property with the appraiser’s value of the property, along with a short summary of how that information was derived.

9 tips for high value home appraisals

Most lenders have an approved appraiser list which requires appraisers to have the appropriate designation. Lenders tend to reject appraisals that are ordered directly by property owners. Lenders want the appraisal to be ordered by the broker or the lender, primarily to avoid potential interference from the property owner.

Home Appraisal Costs
Appraisal costs do vary. Most home appraisals start around $350 (plus tax) but they can go much higher depending on how expensive the home is, complexity of the appraisal and how easily the appraiser can access comparable data.

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